Taylor’s Do-nothing EV Document

Incentives for electric vehicles make sense to Biden, Boris, and OECD – but Taylor apparently knows better.

By Behyad Jafari,
Electric Vehicle Council chief executive.

The goverment’s discussion paper was acutely disappointing.

Angus Taylor’s ‘Future Fuels’ discussion paper is “yet another flaccid, do-nothing document that will prevent Australians getting access to the world’s best electric vehicles,” according to the Electric Vehicle Council.

The government’s paper, launched today, claims incentives for electric vehicle sales don’t stack up, despite the rest of the world rapidly accelerating existing incentive programs. The conservative British government, for example, allocated more than $1bn in subsidies for electric vehicle buyers and charging stations last year alone.

Global leaders from Biden to Boris are rushing to accelerate their transition to electric vehicles, but Angus Taylor reckons he knows something they don’t.

The Prime Minister should have put Mr Taylor on the line to Joe Biden this week. He could have told the President why his electric vehicle plan is misguided. Mr Taylor might have clarified why his modelling shows the top recommendation of the International Energy Agency should be rejected.

A rapid transition to electric vehicles would clean our city air, drastically reduce our carbon emissions, and free us from our insecure dependence on foreign oil imports. Mr Taylor is apparently happy to leave all those benefits on the table and cement Australia’s reputation as the world’s transport tech laggard.

Most other nations, including the US and thae UK, have had fuel efficiency standards in place for decades. Taylor thinks we’re still not ready for even this modest measure.

As always, the result of inaction in a dynamic environment is not stability. Australia’s inertia on EV has been noticed by the global auto sector, which now withholds the best and most affordable electric vehicles from our market.

Many of the most popular electric vehicles in the US and UK are unavailable to Australian consumers and that trend will rapidly accelerate under Taylor’s do-nothing plan.”